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Marbled LEGO bricks and other parts...

IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
Back when the first LEGO sets were produced from 1949-56 under the Automatic Binding Bricks and LEGO Mursten names... with slotted bricks... TLG produced some very interesting marbled slotted bricks as well, which are very highly prized today.

When TLG first started using the plastic injection molding machine to produced LEGO bricks starting in 1949... the manual process of loading the machines with plastic pellets, often created some spillage. TLG workers would sweep up the spilled pellets, and wash them for later use. This was done because of TLGs frugal practice of never throwing anything away!

The swept up plastic pellets were often a mixture of many colors... and when these pellets were loaded into the molding machine, they produced some very beautiful marbled LEGO bricks. These bricks were sold as factor seconds.

LEGO retailers in Denmark sold not only LEGO sets, but also individual LEGO bricks (2x2 and 2x4 only)... at a cost of 11 øre to Danish children. The factory seconds marbled bricks were sold for only 8 øre.

Today many decades later, many of these very beautiful marbled bricks can sell for up to $100 each!! These marbled bricks were only produced for Denmark and Norway.

By 1956 the slotted bricks were retired in favor of hollow bottom bricks, and in 1958 they too were replaced by tube bottom bricks. Also in 1956 the "factory sweepings" were no longer used to make factory second bricks... but instead were used for producing LEGO elements that were painted over.

Among these 'painted" elements were the flat LEGO trees and bushes.

MrJ_NYNatebwAllBrickLegogramstlux
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Comments

  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    Grr, I come on to these posts and leave wanting rare bricks. :P I'm still seriously looking at the one Esso 1x1 on BrickLink. :P
    AllBrick
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    The flat style LEGO trees and bushes were introduced in the Town Plan system in 1955. These were all hand painted. From 1955-60 the hand painting was done by Danish housewives living near Billund. TLG employees would drive around to the homes of these home-workers and drop off more trees/bushes to be painted, and pick up completed ones. The housewives would be given paint and paint brushes to do this piecemeal at home... and obtain spending money in the process.

    Unfortunately the results of this process left a lot to be desired in the output of the workers. Many of the 1955-60 painted trees and bushes are really badly painted... and this entire process was brought inhouse at TLG by 1960, when new trees/bushes designs were put into production. This first image shows some of the big quality and color issues in these early home-painted trees.

    Anyway, because LEGO trees/bushes were to be painted over... TLG often used the mixed color pellets to produce the trees/bushes needed for painting.

    These mixed pellets were sometimes visible on the bottom of these early LEGO trees/bushes (2nd image)...
    AllBrickLegogramstlux
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    These 1950s LEGO trees/bushes, and those later 1960s ones... were often made of bland mixed colors of plastic pellets. But sometimes some really stunning colors can be found underneath all that paint.

    My good Swiss LEGO collector friend Pascal Guerry had a batch of 1960-69 flat LEGO trees that had a lot of paint flaked away... and he decided to remove all of the paint on these trees/bushes. And well the results are absolutely stunning!! ;-)

    (Images from my LEGO collectors guide chapters on LEGO trees and LEGO bricks.)
    plasmodiumAllBrickLegogramstlux
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Even the old 1955-65 Street Lamps had marbling underneath the silver spray painted surfaces. here's an example with white and black marbling... (image thanks to Daniel Johansson)...
    AllBrickLegogramstlux
  • ShibShib UKMember Posts: 4,151
    They should bring the marbled stuff back...it looks so cool.
    Legogram
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Probably the most beautiful marbled LEGO item I have ever seen was one of the old 1:40 scale VW Beetles from the 1950s. This particular model (in the collection of my German LEGO friend Olaf) with the paint removed... turned into a psychedelic "Hippie-Mobile".... ;-)

    carlqMrJ_NYAllBrickLegogramstlux
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Boy what a difference just a few months makes.... I was just talking about marbled LEGO bricks from Denmark and Norway less than 6 months ago, and now there seems to be a whole new genre of LEGO collectibles... the marbled or test LEGO bricks.

    For the longest time the Bayer bricks were the most famous, since they were produced in abundance by the Leverkusen Germany (just 3 miles down the Rhine River from the metropolis of Cologne) Bayer chemical giant.

    And then more recently it was discovered that BASF Corp., another German chemical giant was also producing test bricks (as well as marbled ones)... farther upstream at their massive Ludwigshafen BASF plant along the Rhine, not far from the university city of Heidelberg.

    But more recently, since I started this thread, another entire group of LEGO test and marbled bricks came out... this time from Britain... specifically Scotland and Wales.

    From 1960-92 British LEGO Ltd. was the LEGO licensee that produced LEGO products for Britain, Ireland and Australia. British LEGO was a subsidiary of Courtauld's Corp., a chemical and textile giant that has since been split apart and sold off. British LEGO made the LEGO products for all 3 markets from their Wrexham Wales Courtauld's plant until TLG bought back the LEGO license in 1992.

    But in the late 1970s a chemical maker in Scotland... Borg Warner Chemicals was doing the testing of LEGO brick molds from their Grangemouth Scotland plant. Grangemouth is located halfway between Glasgow and Edinburgh on the River Fourth... and was a river town where oil tankers frequented, thus making plastics an economic mainstay of the area.

    These Grangemouth bricks only recently came to light... and are currently on sale at Bricklink. Although the test bricks resemble regular LEGO bricks in many ways... it seems that a pair of Borg Warner employees were literally playing around with some of the ABS colors, and generated some stunning bricks that are the equals to some of those produced at TLG Billund with "floor sweepings" 2 decades earlier (early 1950s).

    Here is an example of a "Grangemouth LEGO Brick"..... (Courtesy of owner Wrme2)...

    image

    More info on these Grangemouth beauties, and also Samsonite test bricks from Loveland Colorado to come. So much more to say....

    But it looks like my LEGO collectors guide is going to be getting another new chapter (free to current owners).... on LEGO TEST & MARBLED BRICKS.... ;-)
    AllBrickstlux
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    @Istokg How much would one of those marbled 2x4's set me back? There fun, freaky and I want one!
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Bobabricks.... I sent you a message... someone in Bricklink is selling them.

    Just got this nice anecdote about the production at Grandemouth....

    -------------------------------------
    The plastic for Lego used to be made in Grangemouth. (The material was a terpolymer emulsion micelle based on polybutadiene, Styrene and Acrylonitrile). To make sure the colour was perfect, Lego gave the chemical plant a "standard" brick ie the colour it was always to be matched against and also a lego mould. What the QA guys at Grangemouth had to do for colour control was place the "standard" brick in amoungst the "production" bricks, and you were not supposed to be able to tell the difference. A good Quality control method actually.

    So every Christmas? Use yer imagination.

    Which would have went unnoticed until one guy decided to make bricks in crazy colours that were not Lego standard.

    The job was lost and the mould given back to Lego...
    --------------------------------------
  • DougTemplarDougTemplar Edinburgh, ScotlandMember Posts: 442
    Years ago my grandfather had a Newsagents (approx 1955 to 1975) and my mother kept telling me of buying LEGO bricks individually from the shop. According to her the LEGO salesman that came round said my Grandfather was one of the first people to sell LEGO in Scotland she had early LEGO.

    I'm sure somewhere we found some marbled bricks years ago, but I had no idea there were also the Trees etc I'm sure we had those trees as part of our toys growing up and thought they were part of the Britains Farm toys. Goodness knows where they are now.

    This has been a fascinating thread to read thanks for sparking memories.
  • aldreddaldredd United KingdomMember Posts: 203
    wow - they're ... beautiful, if it's possible for moulded plastic to be so. Looking at a set on BL - really tempted. Really really tempted. Would make a great conversation piece at work
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    My German collector friend Olaf never met a marbled LEGO brick he didn't like. In fact he's been very generous in donating images to my collectors guide in other areas... and now that I've added a chapter on marbled bricks and test bricks... here's some of the (many!) new surprises in my collectors guide... ;-)

    A 1950s slotted LEGO brick (LEGO on the underside, not on the studs)... in trans-clear with blue, a rare among the rare...

    image


    These are called "short shots'... production bricks where not enough plastic got into the mold.... very nice!

    image


    And these are called "long shots"... where something prevented the mold from closing completely and extra plastic came out (along the bottom). Long shots are much rarer than short shots.... these are Bayer test strikes (with the "C" on the studs).. interesting color....

    image


    Here we have an early 1950s "floor sweepings" marbled slotted brick. The more beautiful and colorful the brick, the more valuable they are. This is a gem....

    image


    Another early 1950s marbled slotted gem...

    image


    And here are some modern bricks... some are using a mix of uncolored ABS pellets, with just a splash of color added at the end. You can tell that another color was added at the end because the most colorful spots on each of these bricks are around the molding pip on one of the studs.

    image

    These bricks display perfectly why ABS cannot be used to make trans colored bricks.... because ABS in its' natural state is in a milky whitish color. Trans-clear bricks are made of Polycarbonate. But back in the early days, they were made of the same material (Cellulose Acetate) as other bricks, since CA was a clear plastic.
    tobevBrickmanAllBrickstlux
  • monkeymonkey Member Posts: 227
    Istokg said:


    These are called "short shots'... production bricks where not enough plastic got into the mold.... very nice!

    image

    Had no idea these were "nice", got one in dark tan in my Palace Cinema set, had half a mind to complain lol. I think I binned it actually...
  • monkeymonkey Member Posts: 227
    Also found this little one in my collection. It doesn't have much marble but still a cutie

    AllBrick
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    For those who thought that TLG created the really nice marbled bricks 50 years or so ago... guess again!

    My friend Olaf in Germany likes to collect the modern as well as old marbled bricks. Here's his assortment of modern 2x3 bricks. And to be honest... some of these look like confection.... almost good enough to eat!! ;-)

    image

    And here I thought my new LEGO Collectors Guide chapter was going to be primarily 2x4 bricks... but it looks like there were plenty of other size bricks, such as these!

    And monkey.... don't throw any odd bricks away! Just in the past year there has been a substantial new genre of LEGO collecting going on.... and at amazing prices!!
    stlux
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    edited February 2015
    Even regular old slotted bricks from the 1950s are starting to jump in value. These bricks here, from my collector friend Daniel in Sweden.

    These slotted LEGO bricks are from Norway (1953-56), and are known as "Nipple Bricks", with LEGO printed in block letters on the underside.

    image

    Love the color differences!
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Some of the most unusual LEGO bricks were these trans-clear bricks with orange in one of the tubes of each brick. They were sent to LEGO retailers in the late 1950s and early 1960 to show them and their customers how the new tube bottom bricks worked, and how strong they were...

    image

    With proper stacking, it showed the customer how the tubes aligned themselves into columns for stronger support. Here is a LEGO Retailer Catalog image for showing the demonstration to customers. This same illustration can be found in some LEGO idea books of the late 50s and early 60s.

    image
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 385
    edited February 2015
    I've found a few short shots, long shots, marbled and other odd balls over the years. The short and long shots are all Samsonite era bricks. The gray marbled 1x6 plate I believe is from the late 80s. The dark green curved slope is some other type of mold error. I have no idea what happened to the gray 2x4 plate. It looks more like it melted rather than was a long shot.

    I've also found some random ABS pieces (not photoed). They're not pellets, but they're not clearly from a molded piece either. The most recent odd ball find was a piece of wood inside the box. It looks like it came off a pallet and worked it's way in without damaging the box.imageimageimageimage
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Thanks LusiferSam, I especially like the gray 2x4 brick with the "lava flow" oozing out the side. I've never seen a long shot brick with that much excess material (of course that's not saying a lot since long shots are rare and I've seen very few). But those are made when something is preventing the mold from closing completely. So something rather large or crush-proof must have been stuck in that mold when that brick (and others in the same batch) were being made. Thanks for the pics!
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    I found this in one of my Lego bins the other day. It doesn't come up to good through the camera but this 1x1 reddish brown plate has a little black mixed in there. I thought it was interesting.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    edited February 2015
    bobabricks... just put it aside! Ditto for short shots and long shots bricks. The collecting of of old bricks and plates is suddenly very hot right now... some really nice marbled bricks sell for $100 or more. So put this aside, I have the feeling that more of these oddities are going to be introduced accidentally. Marbled plates are not common, and they're not as popular as the 2x4 bricks.... yet!!

    But since we're on the subject of 1x1 plates, one of my Japanese LEGO friends is a whiz with a camera, and took this beautiful crisp and clear image of a 1x1 blue Samsonite plate of 1963-66 era. For some odd reason these blue plates were very brittle (over the years?)... and I sent a few to a Dutch collector in a bubble mailer, but the broke on arrival... with the bubbles still intact on the mailer. Strange.

    Anyway here's the Samsonite LEGO font of 1961-72...

    image

    You can see the heavy retooling marks on this plate, and even the stud is taller because of the retooling of the mold.
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    My piece is pretty modern though (reddish brown). Are modern defected parts worth less than older defected parts?
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847

    My piece is pretty modern though (reddish brown). Are modern defected parts worth less than older defected parts?

    For common parts, bobabricks I would give your question a YES. However, it also depends on the part, and that parts popularity. For example if the defect were a Minifig or a 2x4 brick, it would be more valuable, even if it were a new part. With such a large inventory of different parts that TLG has, the more obscure the part, likely (but not guaranteed) would be less valuable.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Interestingly enough there is a discussion going on right now in Bricklink on the different variants (not defects) of existing parts, and whether or not they should be catalogued. This includes old as well as new parts...

    http://www.bricklink.com/messageThread.asp?ID=184513&nID=893285

    The 2x4 bricks are the most intensely sought after right now for different variations, but it could be that others may follow... although this may have to be limited because the vast number of different LEGO parts could end up having a vast number of mold variants.

    Just that the discussion is going on is showing that there is an entire new genre of LEGO collectibles out there.... marbled bricks, test bricks, mold variations, and error strikes.
  • monkeymonkey Member Posts: 227
    Found the shortie from the Palace Cinema - apparently the hoarder in me saved it from rubbishland! It also has a small black dot on top..

    bobabricksAllBrick
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 385
    Istokg said:

    My piece is pretty modern though (reddish brown). Are modern defected parts worth less than older defected parts?

    For common parts, bobabricks I would give your question a YES. However, it also depends on the part, and that parts popularity. For example if the defect were a Minifig or a 2x4 brick, it would be more valuable, even if it were a new part. With such a large inventory of different parts that TLG has, the more obscure the part, likely (but not guaranteed) would be less valuable.
    I think the answer is more complicated than a simple yes or no. I think it depends on the defect and beauty and/or usability of the part. Marbled bricks that are beautifully marbled or have striking color combinations would be worth more than those look over stirred or have awful colors. Usable items like a backwards Black Falcon, short and long shots that still fit would also be worth more than those that don't fit (like my dark green curved slope) or badly misprinted minifigures.

    Samsonite's quality control was fairly poor compared to TLG's. So defect parts from Samsonite are more common than TLG bricks from the 60s to early 70s. But age has made these both less common.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    LusiferSam is correct.... a very complex issue. My friend Daniel just posted these very interesting bricks that underwent some kind of unknown problems in production (not damaged by kids later).

    These are hollow bottom (1956-58) bricks that came between the earlier slotted bricks (1949-56) and later tube bottom bricks (1958-present). But what really makes them interesting is their dark "wine-red" color... as well as what mold issues they underwent to end up like this...

    image

    image

    These are compared to normal red bricks of that era, and this color really should not even exist. Just more images for my LEGO collectors guide subchapter on molded defect bricks.

    These were likely given away to factory employees in Billund.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Black slotted bricks are extremely rare.... Black slotted marbled bricks.... Yikes!! Very rare indeed!

    image

    From the Maxx3001 collection.
    AllBrick
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    Those "wine red" bricks look like the plastic was burnt in the melting process.
  • BobflipBobflip Member Posts: 314
    I was thinking that the weird surface issue looked like a thin layer of plastic may have stuck to the mold, which I guess could also have been caused by the plastic being burnt!
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    The Bayer Test Bricks have been produced for decades. When TLG made the switch from Cellulose Acetate to ABS plastic in 1963, Bayer was pumping out quite a few test strikes, with different letters of the alphabet representing clutch power and other factors. The "C" bricks won out, and became the standard for ABS production.

    At Christmas 1965 the Bayer Corporation decided to eliminate the inventory of old test bricks, so employees were given bags of bricks to take home to their children in the Leverkusen Germany HQ area (just north of Cologne in the Rhineland). Most surviving Bayer test bricks come from this area, and continue to find their way onto the secondary market. Here is just a sample of the colors they produced... (these are the common "C" bricks, with that letter on the studs...

    image

    These bricks can be purchased for as little as 2 Euros each ($2.27), which is relatively cheap. Anyone want any, I can refer you to sellers (I don't collect them).
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    It's amazing how many people are now suddenly interested in both test and marbled bricks.  There's a group forming on Flickr (I joined) to show off everyone's finds, and there is constant posting about it on Bricklink, which is usually in tune to more modern LEGO.

    There's a whole new 2x4 brick craze starting (about 6 months ago).... minifigs... move over!   B)
    bobabricks
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    @Istokg I found this interesting defect brick I was hoping you could shed some light on.

    It seems to be a 1960's brick with the old more square LEGO rather than LEGO and it has "pat pend" in the bottom. the defected mold makes it look like it is being pulled like a piece of fabric and the color is much lighter, almost salmon red (does not show through on camera. I put it beside a normal red brick for comparison.

  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    @bobabricks very interesting.... it looks like a Cellulose Acetate red brick, which when you say salmon red... that sounds about right.  For some reason red and yellow Cellulose Acetate bricks were used by Samsonite for many years beyond when they were used by TLG in Europe.  I almost swear that TLG shipped leftover red and yellow CA to Samsonite after they switched over to ABS in 1963... but have never found any documentation to support that hypothesis (CA bricks in red and yellow can be found as late as 1970 in Samsonite sets).

    As to what happened to that brick, I really don't know.  I don't think it was ejected from the mold like that.   I wonder at what temperature Cellulose Acetate would warp so badly.... could sticking it into an oven do that?   Good question??
    bobabricks
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 385
    edited March 2015
    I was thinking it must be a CA brick too.  The color and how shiny it looks seem like CA.  I guess the real question is does it sound different when dropped?

    This is beyond warping.  If you look at the bottom photo the edges are all rounded.  If it's truly a molding a error, its one hell of a molding error.  It looks more like it was exposed to some real heat.  This reminds me of photos I've see of bricks that have purposely melted or exposed to high heat.
    bobabricks
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    @LusiferSam It does sound different when dropped.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Now I'm going to have to do a test... put (used) CA brick into the oven at 450 degrees Fahrenheit...  and see what happens?
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    edited March 2015
    Ha ha! I thought it was a defect because I've had a lot of bricks melt on me (severely), I've even had whole bags melt (the lamp I was using was to hot :( ). I've never seen a brick like this. There are also weird lines in the brick that look like it came out in the mold like that rather than melted. I'm not the expert though, that's why I came to you. :P

    Also, the picture doesn't really show what the brick really looks like, it's actually not as red and is less shiny.
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    Although when you think of marbled bricks, usually the old 1950s slotted bricks come to mind.  But that is NOT the case.  My German friend Olaf, must have the right connection.  For my next Collectors Guide updates... free to current owners.... I present "MARBLE MANIA"......  :o


    BobflipbobabricksGalactusstlux
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    @Istokg So does this Olaf guy sell anything because he has a lot of multiples. If so I would like to talk to him. ;)
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    @bobabricks I will make an inquiry!

    One other collector of Grangemouth (Borg-Warner, Scotland) bricks was Nathan, who had amassed these beauties, and displays the proudly on his Flickr account.




    As the announcement was already made, I will be providing articles for the new BRICKS magazine.  I was never involved with BLOCKS.  I will be providing a historical spin to LEGO... from recent years, going all the way back until 1932... that would include LEGO sets, parts (including test and marbled bricks), TLG, the story behind LEGO retailers, customers and even how Pick-A-Brick first started in 1950.
    Niels_TGothamConstructionCobobabricksAanchirGalactusstlux
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 385
    I recently picked up one of the strangest short shots I've ever seen.



    The one on the right is just a short shot macaroni brick, the one on the left is the odd ball.  I thought it was a 1x2 when I found it.  Turns out I don't know what it is.  The start of a tube means that it's a 2x2 or larger brick.  Half the brick (or more) is missing.  Once again a great example of Samsonite's quality control.
    bobabricks
  • bobabricksbobabricks Vancouver, BC, CanadaMember Posts: 1,801
    @LusiferSam How much did you spend for those two?
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 385
    I guess about $0.05 per piece.  But that's not the answer you're really looking for.   The total lot was $23.  I don't search BrickLink or eBay for these types of bricks.  I do however look for Samsonite or 60s and 70s sets.  I normally find these while cleaning or sorting the set or lot.  Most Samsonite sets I have don't have such pieces. 
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    edited April 2015
    Nice @LusiferSam kind of ironic that we don't know what the left brick is.... that doesn't happen too often!

    My new chapter on Marbled Bricks in the next version of my collectors guide is going to have this as the image on the title page..... from my Swedish collector friend Daniel... talk about "ostentatious".... :)



    Even the Automatic Binding Bricks windows/door are marbled!!  This is one hell of a valuable house model!! : :o

    BobflipbobabrickskhmellymelAllBrickstlux
  • LusiferSamLusiferSam MontanaMember Posts: 385
    I just bought some new, mostly, slotted bricks and found a few marbled ones in there.  I've haven't finished sorting these out yet, so there maybe a few more in there.  Some are only slightly marbled, to the point where you might think it's a scuff mark or a dirty brick.  Here are the best ones.


    It's an interesting mix of bricks.  Old, new and really old.  I've found every type of logo but the Samsonite variants (which I would expected to find in a European lot).  Modern, old, small block, large block, barbell, and mixed.
    Niels_TIstokgAllBrickstlux
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    edited May 2015
    Very nice @LusiferSam .... I get the urge for cheesecake when viewing some of those bricks.

    For a real jaw dropping colorful "floor sweepings", one LEGO collector PIROS.... came across this hiding underneath some LEGO paint of a late 1960s LEGO bush..... wow!!




    My new Unofficial LEGO Sets/Parts Collectors Guide is going to have to go way beyond just bricks when discussing marbled LEGO elements.... 
    AllBrickstlux
  • IstokgIstokg MichiganMember Posts: 1,847
    edited June 2015
    This trans-rose colored 1x8 brick was found in Germany.... source unkown....




    And then discovered the same time, but half a world away in Japan.... a light, medium and dark green 1x8 trans-green bricks....  again, source unknown....



    My Unofficial LEGO Sets/Parts Collectors Guide chapter on Prototype parts continues to grow.....  :)
    bobabricksAllBrickstlux
  • Lind_WhispererLind_Whisperer ZotaxMember Posts: 65
    Istokg said:
    The Bayer Test Bricks have been produced for decades. When TLG made the switch from Cellulose Acetate to ABS plastic in 1963, Bayer was pumping out quite a few test strikes, with different letters of the alphabet representing clutch power and other factors. The "C" bricks won out, and became the standard for ABS production. At Christmas 1965 the Bayer Corporation decided to eliminate the inventory of old test bricks, so employees were given bags of bricks to take home to their children in the Leverkusen Germany HQ area (just north of Cologne in the Rhineland). Most surviving Bayer test bricks come from this area, and continue to find their way onto the secondary market. Here is just a sample of the colors they produced... (these are the common "C" bricks, with that letter on the studs... image These bricks can be purchased for as little as 2 Euros each ($2.27), which is relatively cheap. Anyone want any, I can refer you to sellers (I don't collect them).
    Ooh, teal. *drools*

    To where might a person go in search of such bricks?
  • DavidMasonDavidMason GlasgowMember Posts: 4
    Hi, I'm new to this forum but have discovered these old marbled bricks in my parents garage. Most likely these will have been obtained in either the late 60's or 70's in either Glasgow or Edinburgh. I've spotted info regarding Grangemouth bricks, but these seem to be different marbled colours than those. Does anyone have any ideas? I may wish to sell them but need to understand what they are first.
    Thanks in advance.
    AllBrick
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