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Best Camera and Lighting Kit

William_TownsleyWilliam_Townsley Perth, Scotland Member Posts: 766
what is the best camera to use for taking pictures sets

Comments

  • theLEGOmantheLEGOman UKMember Posts: 1,355
    If your taking pictures of smaller LEGO models/scenes, minifigs etc then a nice dslr with a high quality macro lens and tripod would be good with a flash or 2 and reflectors to get a good even spread of light.

    If your shooting large items a macro lens might be too long, so a shorter lens may be beneficial to fit everything in without being stood at the far end of the room.
  • William_TownsleyWilliam_Townsley Perth, Scotland Member Posts: 766
    Any recommended DSLR's And Lens it all confuses me 
  • BooTheMightyHamsterBooTheMightyHamster Northern edge of London, just before the dragons...Member Posts: 854
    Trust me, I'm not being sarcastic, but that's in the same ballpark as asking 'What car should I buy?'

    A DSLR and decent lens will get you some great photos as long as you spend a bit of time and effort learning how to use it.  Having said that, I've taken some terrible shots with a £1000 camera, and seen some amazing images taken on a cheap (ish) smartphone.

    If you think you'll get into photography, then by all means go buy yourself a good camera, but if you just want to take pictures of Lego, then I'd buy a half decent compact for less than £150 and use the money you save to buy more Lego.

    I dabble in Lego photography, and despite having some good cameras (I upgraded about a year ago from a Canon EOS450D to an EOS 70D), the biggest difference I made was via a small light tent and a couple of spotlights.

    I bought one of these a few years ago - the tripod's hopeless and went straight in the bin (I've got a good one), but the tent and the spots have made a huge difference.  And it all folds down to something about the size of an LP.  Obviously it's not much use for a set the size of the Tumbler, because it won't fit in the tent, but for smaller sets it's ideal.  At less than £40 it's a bargain.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Portable-Studio-colour-Background-Tripod/dp/B0064MRG64/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1447414798&sr=8-3&keywords=light+tent

    If you're under 25, you may not know what an LP is...

    Add in some photo editing software to clean up your images...  GIMP is popular (and free: http://www.gimp.org/  and you're well on your way.

    Anyway.  

    Photography isn't something to just jump into without a bit of research - different systems aren't compatible for example.  Two of the most popular brands, Canon and Nikon, use different mounts, so a Canon lens won't fit on a Nikon camera and so forth.

    I'd start with a relatively cheap camera, buy some lights, and then read this guide that Huw published a while back:

    http://brickset.com/article/6180/how-i-take-the-photos-for-reviews

    If the bug bites, then you can invest in better kit later.  If it doesn't, well you haven't spent too much money!

    Have fun!
    SalamalexdrdavewatfordricecakeGothamConstructionCochuckp
  • HuwHuw Brickset Towers, Hampshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 5,620
    Nice article, I'd forgotten I'd written it.

    But as it and you say the camera is almost the least important part of the process, the lighting is far more so.
  • drdavewatforddrdavewatford Hertfordshire, UKAdministrator Posts: 5,882
    Don't do it - it's a world of pain...

    ;-)

    As others have said, the camera itself is the least of your worries. Much more critical is figuring out how to get the best out of the camera, much of which has been time consuming trial and error for me, and sorting some decent lighting.
  • William_TownsleyWilliam_Townsley Perth, Scotland Member Posts: 766
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