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modular rules ?

bookmumbookmum londonMember Posts: 859
I love the look of the modular sets but they are too expensive for me to buy. I am thinking of creating a few of my own. But is there any particular rules about size or anything. When does a creator building officially become a modular?

Comments

  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 14,494
    When lego releases it. All others are just really nice MOCs in the style of.

    Size wise, try to stick to 16 or 32 wide (so you can use a regular baseplate) minus any pavement, but with depth you have a bit more choice, and even more so with height.


    gmonkey76xiahna
  • JudgeChuckJudgeChuck UKMember Posts: 966
    To be fully compatible, you also need to place the Technic pin-holder bricks at specific points along each side of the modular and there are a few other guidelines as well.

    I think the rules are well-documented in a few places, for example here:

    http://www.brickwiki.info/wiki/Modular_houses_standard
    ColoradoBricksgmonkey76bookmumkiki180703Oldfanchuckpxiahna
  • BumblepantsBumblepants Sofia BG/Dallas TXMember Posts: 3,867
    Some people insist on having stair or ladder access between levels as well. I don't adhere to that all the time though.
  • bookmumbookmum londonMember Posts: 859
    It is very 'doll house' to not have stairs. My fabuland buildings of the past often had a lift. 
  • bookmumbookmum londonMember Posts: 859
    I have the blacksmith shop #3739 which is on a 16×16 base, so would this count as 'modular scale'? 
  • BrikingBriking Dorset, UKMember Posts: 690
    ^All the Lego modulars have had stair access.  But if you buy the Lego Neighbourhood Book, you'll find there is no connectivity between the floors in the residential buildings.

    Depends on whether you are building a street scene to look at, or buildings to play with.
    josekalel
  • BrikingBriking Dorset, UKMember Posts: 690
    ^^It's got to be on a baseplate, rather than a plate.  On a 32 stud depth baseplate, there's got to be 9 studs in from the front to the first Technic brick and 9 studs from the back to the 2nd one.  So 16x16 wouldn't qualify.
  • Glacierfalls265Glacierfalls265 USAMember Posts: 178
    The Monster Fighters Haunted House had stairs and people still called it a dollhouse. Then again, it technically wasn't modular because it was all one giant piece with a hinge...
  • ecmo47ecmo47 North CarolinaMember Posts: 1,810
    edited December 2016
    flord is absolutely correct. You will not save any money by trying to build a Modular style building of any detail. Currently available Lego sets will be the cheapest building you will have in your collection. Any creation with detail and flair will be pricy. If Modulars are out of your league, try some of those nice Creator buildings!
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO USMember Posts: 7,929
    bookmum said:
    I love the look of the modular sets but they are too expensive for me to buy. I am thinking of creating a few of my own. But is there any particular rules about size or anything. When does a creator building officially become a modular?
    If you want a good idea for a 'typical' mod (at least dimensions), go to the LEGO site and download some of the modular instruction books for free and check out how they are built, how tall the sets are, how wide, etc.
    Really you should keep an eye out for the Pet shop to see if it pops back up on sale for its 119.99 price, it is the cheapest you are likely to see a LEGO modular set.

    In the end, it is how you want to build. You could make a 'smaller' mod city with a max of two stories akin to the recent Creator building sets that have been released as well.
  • bookmumbookmum londonMember Posts: 859
    @ecmo47 I have got the beach hut and toy shop /grocer creator sets. And santa has got me corner deli. Maybe I will see what I can do with those. 
    madforLEGOkiki180703
  • MrJacksonMrJackson Member Posts: 63
    Honestly, I would recommend starting with the Lego Neighborhood Book.  I borrowed my coworkers' and it's got some great ideas. The design of the modular 16x32 townhouse has the front primarily built with those 1x4 studs-out bricks so that you can easily change the facade. It's a great idea.

    As far as making modular buildings, other than the facade and roof, you really only need a ton of 1xN bricks in your chosen color. Keep and eye on Pick-a-Brick and order during double points promos for the most bang for your buck. 

    It's going to take some experimenting, deciding what style and details you like, tearing it down, changing it, and then repeating the cycle. I look for inspiration prettymuch anywhere; residential areas of big towns and small cities are a good place to start.
    LostInTranslationbookmummadforLEGOLegogramkiki180703chuckp
  • RecceRecce 10,171km away from BillundMember Posts: 591
    Per others have mentioned, just need the technic brick with hole properly aligned at the sides, and 8 studs space front and back, the rest is up to you.

    The easiest would be to use Market Street as a reference to build your own MOC with 16x16 plates (without stairs inside), refer to below picture. Most of the bricks used are mainly standard bricks, plus lots of windows.

     

    From there, you can then proceed to more elaborate exterior designs with furnishings and stairs within, similar to the most recent modular sets. Though you won't save much in terms of cost, unless you only concentrate on the exteriors with inside totally empty.

    madforLEGOkiki180703
  • Speedman29Speedman29 Brickswell CloseMember Posts: 493
    As @MrJackson said, get the Neighbourhood book. I built the Smokestack cafe from plans bought from Brickcity Depot. Then I modified it a bit. I had a few pieces I needed, but had to BL the majority and it wasn't cheap. I ended up leaving the second floor blank before building The Big Bang Theory set into it.



    Now its grown another floor and has the Doctor Strange set in the top.


    Legogramjason1976stluxkiki180703josekalelAllBrick
  • ggfileggfile CanadaMember Posts: 11
    I have my own modular standard for my MOC sets. My standard is 10 studs x 18 studs with a one stud overhang after 2 plates high on 6 studs only (specific studs - to keep a standard) - in order to join modules together - makes a nice, strong join than can be separated fairly easily. See black module attachment to larger 4mod-x-2mod MOC. (none of these models are finished btw)y.
    bookmumcatwrangler
  • bookmumbookmum londonMember Posts: 859
    I have just been building a house for Father Christmas to live in. I have ended up going a bit free style essentially because I am just using the pieces from a couple of creator sets. Parts of it are a bit miss matching colour wise (the way children would usually build) but I have been having lots of fun. 
    Brikingcatwrangler
  • nhyonenhyone Member Posts: 117
    the Lego Neighbourhood Book is inspirational, but take note that 60% of the 200-page book is step-by-step instruction for a Corner Drugstore and a 3-of-a-kind house that you customize by swapping the front facade.
  • josekaleljosekalel Rio Grande Valley, TexasMember Posts: 653
    As someone who just entered the 'modular theme' this year, I say get the LEGO Neighborhood Book is a great start to open your mind about how to approach doing your own, and if you can snag it at a good price like the sales in Brickset, then you're good to go. 

    Also, as a modular newbie, I can agree with the fact that the modulars are a good price and you should invest in one. 

    By the way, anyone tried to do a modular/MOC on a 8x32? Considering how there are many houses in real life that are very narrow, I don't see why this wouldn't be a good idea. 
  • RecceRecce 10,171km away from BillundMember Posts: 591
    8 studs wide will be too narrow for a modular sized scale, though it should fit well with the 3-in-1 Creator houses. 
  • BumblepantsBumblepants Sofia BG/Dallas TXMember Posts: 3,867
    I made an 8 wide modular Maersk shipping office but it throws off things only having one 8 wide so I plan to incorporate it with a new build on a 32x32
  • TrikkyrTrikkyr YorkshireMember Posts: 14
    Only recently into modulars myself (have PC,DO,PR and 2xPS). The Lego Neighbourhood book is very useful, was about £9 on eBay for me. The smaller creator builds are great but generally require multiple sets and building from scratch rapidly piles up cost in parts (unless you already have a huge stock of parts) I'm currently working on a 1950s style diner modular, I'm just an average new builder but it's fun.

    You really can't go wrong with the official sets price and quality wise. They seem expensive but the really aren't for what you get.

    Ive been doing a version of the #31050 Deli corner moc to modular using 3 sets (33% off in sale so £20 a set for £60 total but theres plenty useful parts left over for future use.)
  • gmonkey76gmonkey76 ChicagoMember Posts: 716
    edited December 2016
    @Trikkyr might have to steal your design with a few mods for a butcher shop I want to build.
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,169
    Here' the LEGO Group's own page (from 2007) on what the standards are for a modular building: https://web.archive.org/web/20070831013612/http://factory.lego.com/modularhouses/ModularBuilding.aspx

    The most important considerations for a modular building are that it has Technic pins/pin holes in the right places to join up with other buildings, and that the openings where one floor connects to the one below it all line up (so you can multiply the middle floors to your liking or remove them entirely).
    davetheoxygenmanricecake
  • josekaleljosekalel Rio Grande Valley, TexasMember Posts: 653
    @Recce @Bumblepants I think an 8x32 modular/MOC is a good challenge for anyone, maybe we can make it a Brickset challenge hint hint :p I'll try to attempt to make one, but my skill is very limited. We'll see. 

    I thought about an 8x32 when I realized that some city plans from the early 1900s showed that the commercial plots in Main Street (at least the city near me) were 'half' a regular residential plot. 
  • AdzbadboyAdzbadboy London, UKMember Posts: 2,287
    Width of Modular Buildings: 32, 24, 16, 12, 10.

    I reckon going smaller than that will be very tricky unless it's an alleyway or something similar.
  • TrikkyrTrikkyr YorkshireMember Posts: 14
    @gmonkey76 31050 would make a good basis for a butcher's shop moc, me I'm not great at MOC's yet so I like a basic build I can modify, I just went with a more traditional Deli inside with some display counters and chillers etc and the outside sandwich window. Used parts from 3 sets and other parts I had but still had to fill the back side wall with odd coloured bricks as I ran a bit short on the orange and blue till I get round to getting more. Be interested in seeing how yours comes out if you go ahead with it.
    gmonkey76
  • BrikingBriking Dorset, UKMember Posts: 690
    8 wide is a challenge.  Side walls take 2 studs.  Door is 4 studs.  So if you want a window on the ground floor, it is 2 studs wide.  Not sure that will look realistic.

    And moving from ground to floor 1, side walls + stairs take up the same 6 studs.

    How about a 32 stud plate? 2 outside walls and 2 inside walls.  28 studs to go.  Sounds like 9 studs inside 2 buildings and 10 inside one?  Could be a realistic terrace.
  • MrJacksonMrJackson Member Posts: 63
    For those of you postulating 8x32 or 24x32 modulars, where are you getting those width baseplates? The 8x exist but are prohibitively expensive and, honestly, not worth the effort in my opinion. Besides the lack of width for detail, it will skew the dimensions if you have them laid out in city-block form back-to-back.
  • josekaleljosekalel Rio Grande Valley, TexasMember Posts: 653
    @MrJackson I wasn't thinking on 8x32 baseplates, just having the modular on a 32x32 baseplate since it's the cheapest option.

    These are a few examples of why I would try to do a 8x32 modular...again, the challenge is on! ;)








  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 14,494
    ^ Go for it. The other rule of modular MOCs is having fun designing and building them.
    Bumblepants
  • bookmumbookmum londonMember Posts: 859
    @Pitfall69 I have been waiting for someone to make a joke like that after I gave this discussion it's title! 
    Pitfall69SumoLegoClutchPower
  • AdzbadboyAdzbadboy London, UKMember Posts: 2,287
    MrJackson said:
    For those of you postulating 8x32 or 24x32 modulars, where are you getting those width baseplates? The 8x exist but are prohibitively expensive and, honestly, not worth the effort in my opinion. Besides the lack of width for detail, it will skew the dimensions if you have them laid out in city-block form back-to-back.
    I was referring to the actual widths of the individual buildings:

    32 - Green Grocer, Fire Brigade, Town Hall, Parisian Restaurant
    24 - Cafe Corner, Grand Emporium, Palace Cinema, Parisian Restaurant, Brick Bank
    16 - Market Street, Townhouse, Pet Shop, Detective's Office, Barber Shop
    15 - Bakery
    14 - Cafe
    12 - Brick Bank
    10 - Barber Shop and Laundromat
    6 - Barber Shop
  • luckyrussluckyruss UKMember Posts: 839
    edited December 2016
    @MrJackson Just go with 2 8x16 plates (which are much easier to get hold of) - I built a 24x32 using a 16x32 and two 8x16s, as long as you get the split on the correct side for stability on your build, it should work out.
  • ggfileggfile CanadaMember Posts: 11
    bookmum said:
    I have just been building a house for Father Christmas to live in. I have ended up going a bit free style essentially because I am just using the pieces from a couple of creator sets. Parts of it are a bit miss matching colour wise (the way children would usually build) but I have been having lots of fun. 
    That's the way most of my models are built. I later swap out pieces to make the final version of the set.
  • Sethro3Sethro3 United StatesMember Posts: 805
    I built a Modular Kwik-e-mart at 24 wide, and used the remaining 8 wide for another building. It looks "okay" but not spectacular. It definitely looks really narrow compared to every other modular, just as those real buildings look out of place above.

    Either way, my 8 wide ended up having stairs and an atm on the main level. The second level was a concession stand for the arcade above the Kwik-e-mart, so it was useful for that, but not really a true building I suppose. I'll likely redesign it sometime, but I had it finished for a LEGO show last spring at least.

    With that said, it is definitely tricky. Even a 10 wide building gives you so much freedom, so take that into consideration. I think I'll stick with 12-16 wide buildings for the rest of my stuff. It just looks better in comparison to others. Too narrow or too wide draws too much attention.

    Good luck!
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