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Lego Quality

TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 549
I recieved a VW Beetle #10252 today. And the Mrs is now building it. She has notice that two of the 1x4 tiles are scratched, one of the 1x2 slopes is scratched and another piece has a nick in it. 

The instruction booklet was also bent up in the box.

Is the quality of Lego parts on the decline?

Or is this just bad luck?

Comments

  • PaperballparkPaperballpark UKMember Posts: 2,398
    Just bad luck. It's not as if they have a guy in the warehouse whose specific job is to scratch parts and bend instructions books all day long...
    SprinkleOtterbobabricksbeemo
  • Switchfoot55Switchfoot55 Washington, USAMember Posts: 352
    ^at least not any more...
    SprinkleOtterchuckpbobabricks
  • madforLEGOmadforLEGO USMember Posts: 7,877
    I*nstruction books being bent up happens unless the instructions are on a cardboard piece (not sure if they do that anymore). Call LEGO CS, they are pretty good about resolving such issues
    josekalel
  • calumheathcalumheath Member Posts: 19
    I agree: it's just bad luck.

    Think of all the other billions of pieces that AREN'T scratched.
    beemo
  • josekaleljosekalel Rio Grande Valley, TexasMember Posts: 653
    Regarding bent instructions or bent stickers, I think LEGO should try to do something about it, especially in smaller sets where stickers are important.

    Maybe they can tape both the instruction booklet and the stickers together to the inside of the box? I don't think it's lack of quality or quality control, they are just overlooking at the fact that paper gets damaged in transit. 
  • TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 549
    To be fair it was the number of scratched and notched bricks that shocked me. I had never noticed that before in a Lego set and it made me wonder if a specially poor quality plastic had been used!
  • quir0zquir0z Member Posts: 17
    Made in China. Sadly, Some Lego elements are now manufactured in places where quality is second to quantity. However, Lego is not getting any cheaper than it was when they were 100% Billund made.
  • SprinkleOtterSprinkleOtter Member Posts: 2,381
    quir0z said:
    Made in China. Sadly, Some Lego elements are now manufactured in places where quality is second to quantity. However, Lego is not getting any cheaper than it was when they were 100% Billund made.
    It has been decades since they were 100% Billund made...
    VorpalRyustluxAanchirClutchPower
  • AanchirAanchir United StatesMember Posts: 2,159
    quir0z said:
    Made in China. Sadly, Some Lego elements are now manufactured in places where quality is second to quantity. However, Lego is not getting any cheaper than it was when they were 100% Billund made.
    It has been decades since they were 100% Billund made...
    Yep, Samsonite manufactured LEGO bricks in the United States from 1961 to 1972. LEGO opened their own factory in Switzerland in 1971 and their own factory in the US in 1973. https://www.lego.com/en-us/legohistory#manufacturing

    And for the most parts sets actually DO cost much less than they did back then! Let's rewind fifty years to 1966 when Samsonite released the #375 Medium Basic Set with 375 parts (383 if you count wheels and tires separately, as BrickLink does) for a mere $8.95… or, in today's money, $67.83. Whereas this year you can get the #10705 Creative Building Basket for $59.99 with 1000 pieces.
    SprinkleOtterdavetheoxygenmanBobflipbeemo
  • TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 549
    It is also noteworthy that the the blue bricks and slopes are a different shade to the modified bricks and plates. Guess the parts are made at different factories.
  • TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 549
    Oh and the whites are different shades too! Wow i sound like a moaning mini!
  • Switchfoot55Switchfoot55 Washington, USAMember Posts: 352
    Maybe it was a Lepin infiltrator trying to sabotage the credibility of Lego product... 
    TheFew
  • VorpalRyuVorpalRyu AustraliaMember Posts: 1,751
    With the way Lego is packaged, it's not a shock, anything sold loose in a bag can be prone to getting minor scratches & marks, but if they changed packaging methods, it would drive up the cost. It's not the biggest issue, considering TLG will happily replace damaged & missing parts, even on sets like event exclusives (I've had missing parts with two sets so far, both were event exclusives).
    TheFewSprinkleOtter
  • TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 549
    edited December 2016
    I'm clearly becoming too much of a Victor Meldrew as I age.. :-)
    VorpalRyu
  • VorpalRyuVorpalRyu AustraliaMember Posts: 1,751
    Not familiar with the character so I had to Google it, but you're not alone there, I think it happens to all of us, to one extent or another.
    TheFew
  • TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 549
    VorpalRyu said:
    Not familiar with the character so I had to Google it, but you're not alone there, I think it happens to all of us, to one extent or another.
    Wow, you have missed out. It was really funny TV (in my opinion). Perhaps a bit dated now however! 
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 14,350
    edited December 2016
    quir0z said:
    Made in China. Sadly, Some Lego elements are now manufactured in places where quality is second to quantity. However, Lego is not getting any cheaper than it was when they were 100% Billund made.
    How do you know which (system) parts are made where? Quite a few of the Chinese (minifigure) parts are still individually bagged.

    And it is the handling afterwards that is important, not where they are made.
  • datsunrobbiedatsunrobbie West Haven , CTMember Posts: 762
    CCC said:
    quir0z said:
    Made in China. Sadly, Some Lego elements are now manufactured in places where quality is second to quantity. However, Lego is not getting any cheaper than it was when they were 100% Billund made.
    How do you know which (system) parts are made where? Quite a few of the Chinese (minifigure) parts are still individually bagged.

    And it is the handling afterwards that is important, not where they are made.
    Vast majority of electronics for sale these days are made in China. I'm always amused when people rag on Chinese manufacturing quality while showing off their new iPhone.
    VorpalRyuAanchirLyichirstluxsid3windrbeemo
  • CCCCCC UKMember Posts: 14,350
    CCC said:
    quir0z said:
    Made in China. Sadly, Some Lego elements are now manufactured in places where quality is second to quantity. However, Lego is not getting any cheaper than it was when they were 100% Billund made.
    How do you know which (system) parts are made where? Quite a few of the Chinese (minifigure) parts are still individually bagged.

    And it is the handling afterwards that is important, not where they are made.
    Vast majority of electronics for sale these days are made in China. I'm always amused when people rag on Chinese manufacturing quality while showing off their new iPhone.
    Yep. And not just the big price stuff. I get 4-5 aliexpress packages through my door most days containing 50p-£1 orders for parts.
  • Sven_FSven_F CroatiaMember Posts: 15
    Even though the Jiaxing factory is now operational,  I highly doubt any pieces from that set bought in US were made there. (not that I would imply this would be noticeable) I don't know the extent of damage,  but tiles and slopes particularly are very prone to surface scratches and if minor could be considered  a normal occurrence in new sets. You can contact customer service for replacements. 
  • TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 549
    So i have just been building my Saturn V and I am amazed by the number of scratched parts. So of the marks seem to have occurred by peice on piece rubbing in the box once packed. Other marks are systematic such as those in the below pictures which occur on all parts of that type. Am i just unlucky or are are Saturn V sets made from seemingly inferior parts?





  • MaffyDMaffyD West YorkshireMember Posts: 1,496
    Either the parts on all my sets are perfect, or I need to examine them a bit more closely as I build! I don't have the Saturn V set so I can't help you @TheFew - sorry.
  • RecceRecce 10,171km away from BillundMember Posts: 582
    I*nstruction books being bent up happens unless the instructions are on a cardboard piece (not sure if they do that anymore). Call LEGO CS, they are pretty good about resolving such issues
    Indeed, here's mine.



  • darthdcdarthdc Member Posts: 150
    I'm just wondering whether there is any risk of Gold Plastic Syndrome with some pieces. I've heard how gold plastic has a tendancy to decay over years, and I've heard how some toys from the 80's and such, have suffered from this. Just looking at one prime example - the Flying Warrior from CMF Series 15. You don't get much golder than him.
  • FowlerBricksFowlerBricks USAMember Posts: 149
    TheFew said:
    So i have just been building my Saturn V and I am amazed by the number of scratched parts. So of the marks seem to have occurred by peice on piece rubbing in the box once packed. Other marks are systematic such as those in the below pictures which occur on all parts of that type. Am i just unlucky or are are Saturn V sets made from seemingly inferior parts?





    Scratches are kind of unavoidable and they don't really mess anything up. Cracks sometimes can, but scratches won't.
  • OldfanOldfan Chicagoland, IL, USAMember Posts: 554
    @TheFew:  Is that green part in your second picture a standard 1x2 tile?  If so, it looks like a mold-flow issue, the part doesn't appear to have filled out completely to the middle during the injection molding process.  I've never seen that type of issue in 1x2 tiles, are there really two injection points on opposite sides of this piece?
  • TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 549
    Oldfan said:
    @TheFew:  Is that green part in your second picture a standard 1x2 tile?  If so, it looks like a mold-flow issue, the part doesn't appear to have filled out completely to the middle during the injection molding process.  I've never seen that type of issue in 1x2 tiles, are there really two injection points on opposite sides of this piece?
    Ir is a 1x2 cheese slope... if that description means anything to you!
  • TheFewTheFew EnglandMember Posts: 549
    Well two of them side by side!
  • OldfanOldfan Chicagoland, IL, USAMember Posts: 554
    TheFew said:
    Well two of them side by side!

    OK, thanks for clarifying.  That makes a lot more sense to me than what I thought I saw...
    sid3windrbeemo
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