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Heroica available on US shop.lego.com

bluelion3bluelion3 Member Posts: 156
edited June 2011 in Shopping USA/Canada
Heroica is now available on the US shop.lego.com website.
Draida Bay USD $14.99
Caverns of Nathuz USD $19.99
Waldurk Forest USD $19.99
Castle Fortaan USD $29.99 (Ouch!)

I was curious to see how LEGO would present a D&D/RPG style game, but these prices are pretty high for curiosity alone. After viewing the rules on various websites, I think the game is more simplistic than I wanted as an AFOL and minor D&D nerd from the 1980's.

It's odd that Draida Bay is for ages 7+ but the other three are for ages 8+.

The photos for Waldurk Forest show 3 hero microfigures and 4 enemy microfigures, but the game description says "5 microfigures". Likewise Draida Bay's photo shows 8 microfigures vs the description of 4 microfigures. The other two have the same issue.

What do you think of the games and the prices?

Comments

  • mkoeselmkoesel USAMember Posts: 97
    edited June 2011
    Thanks for the heads-up bluelion3.

    I really want these games. They look fun, and I was always a fan of games like Talisman as a kid. But I haven't seen any reviews yet - I'd like to know what others think.

    Did anyone manage to snag these at TRU for 25% off this weekend? I know they had a sale that included Lego games, and I know I read reports of Heroica showing up at TRU sometime last week.

    If anyone has these and has some quick impressions, let us know.
  • davee123davee123 USAMember Posts: 797
    It's cute, but it's pretty much what one ought to expect-- They took something like BrickQuest and scaled it way down simplicity-wise. Roughly:

    - You have 4 hit points. If you are ever reduced down to 0 hit points, you're "defeated", and you must retreat 1 square, and recover your hit points by rolling the die, and getting back hit points based on the number you rolled (1-4). When you're healed back to 4 hit points, you can continue adventuring, but not before!

    - Monsters effectively have 1 hit point. During combat, there are ~essentially~ 3 options on a given turn:

    A) You defeat the monster (50% chance)
    B) You defeat the monster, and the monster hurts you (16.67% chance)
    C) The monster hurts you (33% chance)

    When the monster hurts you, it hurts you according to its "power" level. Most monsters have a power of 1, some have a power of 2, and "bosses" have a power of 3.

    - Each character has a special ability. When you roll a "shield", you MIGHT have the ability to use your special ability, if applicable, and if you decide to use it. The abilities are:

    A) Barbarian - Defeat ALL the adjacent monsters to your square (MELEE)
    B) Cleric? - Heal yourself up to your full health (RANGED)
    C) Knight - Walk up to 2 squares and defeat an adjacent monster (RANGED)
    D) Ranger - Defeat a monster up to 5 squares away in a straight line (RANGED)
    E) Sorcerer - Defeat a monster up to 4 squares away (even around corners) (RANGED)
    F) Thief - Defeat one monster, and get 1 gold in the process (MELEE)

    - There are "weapons" for sale, each of which costs 3 gold, and is re-sellable for 2 gold. When you purchase a weapon, it allows you to have one of the abilities listed above, and use them in lieu of your already existing ability.

    That's pretty much it, apart from the basic mechanics of how you roll the die and move around (pretty simplistic). There are other tidbits like potions, treasure chests, moving walls, locked doors, etc., but they're not overly important to the mechanics of the game-- they're just fun extra fluff.

    Anyway, it's no substitute for BrickQuest or BrikWars.

    My experience (having played a whopping 3 times now) is that you absolutely, positively, NEED to have a larger board to make the game enjoyable. With any one of the 4 games individually, you're lucky if you can afford to buy anything at ALL before the game ends, and even luckier if you actually GET TO USE whatever you bought, because you can only use your special powers when you roll a "shield".

    We played last night with all 4 boards assembled "as shown", and it was FAR more enjoyable. With all of the game elements at once (moving walls, rubble piles, etc), the game actually started to become complex enough to be strategic.

    Like almost EVERY OTHER LEGO game, the rules don't explain the full extent of the nuances of the game. For instance:

    - Does your turn end when you land adjacent to a monster, or do you IMMEDIATELY roll to battle it? (We assumed the former)

    - Can you shoot through locked doors? Magic walls? Rock piles? Other Monsters? Other players?

    - When you land on another player that's "in combat", do you move *beyond* the monster he's fighting, too?

    - When you roll a shield to pass through a magic wall/rubble pile/locked door, and there's a monster IMMEDIATELY on the other side, do you pass the monster? And if so, when he defeats you, does he force you back through the door, or further along your way?

    Questions like that are annoyingly unaddressed in the rules, and you're forced to come up with your own workarounds. And typically, because the questions don't arise until you're PLAYING, whoever volunteers a solution might have something to gain by suggesting a particular solution, so it "feels" like you might be cheating. But I guess that's nothing new for the LEGO games-- seems like several of them have bizarre loopholes like that.

    DaveE
  • brickmaticbrickmatic Member Posts: 1,071
    Well, that makes sense. The LEGO games are designed to encourage you to mod the rules just as you might mod a set using bricks. The whole point is creativity, so they give you a basic starting point and leave it up to you to make it better.

    I like it. Seems like there is a lot of potential to make this game epic.
  • rocaorocao Administrator Posts: 4,283
    @davee123: that's a great overview of the new play system, and I think it would be a shame for the information to remain buried in this Shopping category. Do you intend to write a review or would you create a Heroica discussion in "Everything else LEGO"? If the answer is no to both, would you mind if I promoted it myself?

    I also think the lack of clarity in the rules is something that warrants being brought to the attention of TLG, and I'm sure they'd be interested in feedback and constructive criticism considering their headlong dive into LEGO games. I'm going to see if forwarding this on to through the LEGO Ambassadors would be effective.
  • bluemoosebluemoose Member Posts: 1,716
    I also think the lack of clarity in the rules is something that warrants being brought to the attention of TLG ...
    My understanding is the 'lack of clarity' is deliberate, to encourage dynamic problem solving as part of LEGO's philosophy of encouraging learning through play.

  • rocaorocao Administrator Posts: 4,283
    ^ heh, I'm glad you saw that... it saved me the trouble of pointing you to this thread. I haven't seen the manual myself, but I wonder if it makes it clear that the rules are flexible and subject to interpretation. I play a lot of games, and barriers to understanding gameplay are often critical failings of otherwise great games.
  • davee123davee123 USAMember Posts: 797
    it would be a shame for the information to remain buried in this Shopping category. Do you intend to write a review or would you create a Heroica discussion in "Everything else LEGO"? If the answer is no to both, would you mind if I promoted it myself?
    I guess I hadn't really thought about it-- I merely came across the thread when I was considering buying the game, and now that I've bought it, I figured I'd reply with my feedback. Hmm... maybe I'll start a new thread, since there's a lot that can be discussed here. I've been reading the discussion on Eurobricks too-- they had some different interpretations of the few oddities I mentioned above.
    I also think the lack of clarity in the rules is something that warrants being brought to the attention of TLG, and I'm sure they'd be interested in feedback and constructive criticism considering their headlong dive into LEGO games.
    My guess is that they wanted to keep the rules as short-and-sweet as possible, in all cases. IE, keep them to as few pages as possible so that the time spent reading rules is minimized, and the time spent playing is maximized. Given that the games are supposed to be open-ended, it's not seen as all that bad (IE, kids will FIND a solution, even if it's inconsistent). I (and other AFOLs) are sort of the opposite-- we don't mind reading more rules if it saves us having to play the uncomfortable role of arbitration during a game.

    My recommendation to LEGO would be that they publish additional "exception" rules online as a way of resolving disputes, but keep the printed rulesets the same, since it likely matches their target audience better.

    DaveE
  • YellowcastleYellowcastle Administrator Posts: 4,401
    As there's not much else noted here, couldn't this just be transmogrified into the Heroica topic?
  • mkoeselmkoesel USAMember Posts: 97
    edited June 2011
    Thank you very much davee123 for your most thorough post. The rules sound good to me. They are simple enough for my young boys to enjoy without getting confused or frustrated, and yet just deep enough to hold my interest. I am definitely picking these games up when I can find them on sale.

    I also predict a lot of custom expansion boards contributed by the community. And the cost for microfig parts and 2x2 jumper plates on BrickLink is likely to go up. :)
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